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September 19th, 2020 Pardon our dust, the blog is currently being updated — There may be a few glitches for a few days

Updated the Website – Apologies for the Errant Notifications

Moved Website to a New Host and Put in A New and Faster and Wider Page Layout After the last series on the Hololens 2, I was finding that the page layout “theme” was too confining and it was difficult to view the pictures. I wanted a bit wider page to make images more readable. I started moving to a new page builder (DIVI) that was much more flexible. In the process, I also updated the PHP version. This caused the website to lock up for almost a whole day. It took about 24 hours with my old host (BlueHost)…

Hololens 2 Display Evaluation (Part 6: Microsoft’s FUD on Photographs)

Introduction (Marketing FUD) Microsoft recently put up an FAQ page with the topic heading. Why am I unable to take an accurate photograph of my HoloLens 2 display?. The purpose of this FAQ seems to be to discourage and discredit talking picture taking of the Hololens 2 (HL2) through the optics rather than to provide useful information. The FAQ includes incorrect and misleading information. I would classify it is “Marketing FUD” used to cast doubt on any pictures that are taken. This blog is read by many key people in the AR industry, including many at Microsoft, and reaches about 20,000…

Hololens Display Evaluation (Part 5: Poor Intensity Control)

Introduction – Following Up on Color Control As I noted in Hololens Display Evaluation (Part 3: Color Uniformity), one the first things when I first tried a Hololens 2 (HL2) was that colors were washed out (see below). The color was much worst than the Hololens 1. So what’s wrong with the HL2’s intensity control? After all, the HL2 is starting with lasers that have highly saturated colors, so why are the colors so washed out? The severe color uniformity problems of the HL2 tends to mask the poor color and intensity control of the laser beam scanning (LBS) engine…

Hololens 2 Display Evaluation (Part 4: LBS Optics)

Introduction I received an email from David Kessler, an expert in optics and who has designed several laser beam scanning displays. In that email, David wrote that my speculation Hololens 2 (HL2) might be using the pupil expansion method shown in their US10,025,093 patent (right) was incorrect. David said that the HL2 was not using a screen-like pupil expander (EPE 306). Microsoft’s Hololens 2 announcement video, a still from which is on the left, showed the scanning engine with mirror optics. More recently, there was a teardown with a video by a Microvision stock investor “u/s2upid” user on Reddit who tore apart a Trimble version HL2 just to…

Hololens Display Evaluation (Part 3: Color Uniformity)

Introduction – A Single Image With Both the Left and Right Displays For today, I’m going to show a single image as seen through the left and right display in the Hololens 2 (HL2). I have verified that the pictures below match what I see with my own eyes reasonably well. The human vision is “subjective” and works on relative comparisons and will not perceive changes in intensity and color if they are gradual. The camera is “objective” and is not influenced by gradual changes in intensity and color like the human visual system. The test pattern totally fills the…

Hololens 2 Display Evaluation (Part 2: Comparison to Hololens 1)

Introduction – Answering a Simple Question In response to Hololens 2 Display Evaluation (Part 1: LBS Visual Sausage Being Made), someone asked, “How does the Hololens 2 (HL2) compare to the Hololens 1 (HL1) in terms of image quality.” I had read someone else comment that while he like many of the new features and ergonomics of the HL2, he though thought the image quality of the HL1 was much better. I decided to fire up the Hololens 1 and see for myself. Sure enough, the Hololens 1 was dramatically sharper. I decided to shoot pictures of the HL1 display…

Hololens 2 Display Evaluation (Part 1: LBS Visual Sausage Being Made)

Introduction A Hololens 2 (HL2) was purchased directly from the Microsoft store online, and I have been evaluating its display technology for a couple of weeks. Unfortunately, this further pushed out my article on MicroLEDs that I have been working. Since the HL2 uses laser beam scanning (LBS), seen by some as a competing display technology with MicroLEDs, discussing the HL2 provides some foundation information for the coming MicroLED article. This blog posting follows up on two articles I wrote in 2019; namely, Hololens 2 is Likely Using Laser Beam Scanning Display: Bad Combined with Worse and Hololens 2 First…

Apple Glass Leak (Part 3) – Revenue Streams, There Has to be a Camera, and All-Day Wear

Introduction – Building on Prosser’s Leak This article builds on Part 1 and Part 2 in this series on Jon Prosser’s Apple Glass Leak. I want to caution everyone, that I am trying to “fit” available technical information to what noted Apple “leaker” Jon Prosser reported in a May 29, 2020, YouTube video. Unfortunately, Prosser does not even give a detailed description, such as whether the lenses were curved or flat, was there a front shield, was there “glints” of color (see right). Prosser claims to have as yet unreleased videos, which likely will give further clues if not definitely…

AWE On-Line Conference May 26th to 29th

Just a quick note that AWE, like so many others, is going with an online version of the conference this year. This will be my first online conference, so I will be interested to see how it works. I have enjoyed going to AWE for the last two years. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to walk the floor to see the technology with my own eyes. But if you pick up a good idea or two, it should be worth the cost of admission. Since it is online-only, they have discounted the conference to $199 for all four days (link…

Analyzing Apple Glass Leak (Part 2) – Akonia Waveguide with an LCOS MicroDisplay

Introduction “Act in haste, repent in leisure,” they say. In my first article on FPT’s Jon Prosser’s video leak giving information on Apple Glass, I didn’t discuss what just about every other tech magazine mentioned, namely Apple’s purchase of Akonia Holographics. I even wrote about Akonia’s patents back in November 2019: Most of the few “serious” patents seem to come from companies acquired by Apple. Additionally, A simple search of patent applications assigned to Apple directly will not turn up all of their AR patents. For example, Apple acquired Akonia Holographics back in August 2018, but the Akonia patent applications show on the…

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